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Photo: NWphotoguy/Getty Images

In normal years, my favorite advice for Thanksgiving morning comes from the food and culture writer Annaliese Griffin: Take one thing off your menu.

She means the extra pumpkin pie or that new Brussels sprouts salad recipe you clipped last week, that—seriously!—nobody will miss. But this year, maybe the thing you take off the menu should be… the turkey? Or the pressure you put on yourself to make things perfect? Or the whole damn thing?

Seriously, there’s nothing wrong with making today the day you binge The Crown (season 4 is great). Or go ahead and feast—but do it without the constraint of the traditional menu. Why bother with the green bean casserole when Aunt Norma is the only one who likes it anyhow, and you’re only seeing her on Zoom? …


Grilled cheese sandwich and tomato soup.
Grilled cheese sandwich and tomato soup.
Photo: Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images

Do you know what’s for dinner Wednesday night? My colleague Cari Nazeer asked that question in a Forge Daily Tip this past Saturday, on the last weekend before Election Day. A “low-stakes action plan,” Cari wrote, is “a way to claim agency over some small sliver of life, even if everything else is scary.”

It was just the prompt I needed. I tend to cook my feelings, so I spent much of this anxious weekend stirring bubbling vats of green tomato chutney and vacuum-sealing pouches of salsa. …


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Photo: Lucas Uebel/Getty Images

I Miss Big, Wet, Embarrassing Kisses From My Father,” John DeVore wrote yesterday on his Medium site, Humungus.

It was a one-day-later reflection on a truly awful tweet—one that is (thankfully) already fading into the morass of toxicity that this election cycle has unleashed. John Cardillo, a right-wing pundit, captioned a photo of Joe Biden hugging his son with the question: “Does this look like an appropriate father/son interaction to you?”

“The message is both muddy and crystal clear,” DeVore writes:

Cardillo is plainly suggesting there is something… off… about these two men. …


‘Don’t you have enough?’ an ABC executive asked the legendary writer-producer-showrunner Shonda Rhimes

Shonda Rhimes.
Shonda Rhimes.
Shonda Rhimes attends the 2019 Vanity Fair Oscar Party hosted by Radhika Jones at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts on February 24, 2019 in Beverly Hills, California. Photo: Gregg DeGuire/FilmMagic/Getty Images

It might sound petty.

The legendary writer-producer-showrunner Shonda Rhimes was making tens of millions, and her prime-time shows — Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal, and How to Get Away With Murder — were blockbuster successes, reviving the fortunes of her parent network, ABC. Sure, Rhimes was tiring of the constant battles with her employer, according to a new interview in The Hollywood Reporter. But it was a small snub from an executive over a $154 Disneyland day pass that was the last straw.

As Lacey Rose writes in THR, Rhimes was entitled to two Disneyland passes as a perk of her employment. She had asked for an additional pass for her sister, who wanted to take her children and their nanny to the park for a day while Rhimes was…


Resources

Examine your article with a series of ‘lenses’ to ensure you have the crispest, cleanest copy

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Photo by Thought Catalog on Unsplash

For the launch of Creators Hub, Indrani Sen delivers a self-editing checklist she’s used to fortify her copy for 10+ years. Sen is the Editor-in-Chief for Forge.

In newsrooms, editors often talk about the text that writers file using a hygiene metaphor: “Clean” copy is grammatically correct, solidly written, and generally needs only light editing to be publishable. If you’re working with an editor, filing clean copy will make them love you — and want to work with you more. If you’re publishing directly, it’s even more important that your copy is spotless!

The best way to make sure you file (or self-publish) the crispest, cleanest copy possible is to create your own process of self-editing — catching errors, fact-checking, and smoothing the language. …


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Photo: Kort Duce/Getty Images

Acing law school with a newborn could not have been easy, even for one of the greatest legal thinkers of the century. But for the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, balancing parenting with studying provided an education in itself. She credits her baby daughter with spurring her on, as well as providing useful perspective.

“My success in law school, I have no doubt, was in large measure because of baby Jane,” she wrote in a 2016 New York Times column. “I attended classes and studied diligently until 4 in the afternoon; the next hours were Jane’s time, spent at the park, playing silly games or singing funny songs, reading picture books and A. A. Milne poems, and bathing and feeding her. After Jane’s bedtime, I returned to the law books with renewed will. …


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Photo: Kerem Yucel/Getty Images

On the same day last week — Sunday, August 23 — two American men had violent encounters with police officers.

You’ve heard about one of them: Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, is now paralyzed, after police shot him seven times in the back, while his three sons, aged three, five, and eight, watched. Blake had been trying to break up a fight and was walking back to the car where his kids were waiting.

The other, you probably haven’t heard about: Richard Grant Lees of Draper, Utah, reportedly fired an AR-15 at a police officer and then ran into a neighbor’s yard with his loaded weapon. Unlike the Kenosha officers, the Draper officer on the scene didn’t return fire, instead ducking for cover and verbally calling for Lees to drop his gun—partly out of concern for his nine-year-old son, who was standing nearby. …


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Screenshot via YouTube

Anti-Black racism remains rampant among South Asians, as some of the reactions to vice-presidential hopeful Kamala Harris (who is of Indian and Jamaican heritage) show.

In this YouTube video, a Sikh American lays out eloquently the complicity of South Asians who submit to the “model minority” myth and ignore and participate in anti-Black systemic racism:

“Big Floyd was murdered by police outside of a grocery store,” says Jagmeet “Hoodini” Singh, a Los Angeles-based rapper, as he walks through a convenience store. “See, my uncles also operate grocery stores, liquor stores, mini-marts, and so on. … We became well-educated, well-to-do, and, well, accommodating. We complied with a status quo that keeps telling us that we’re ‘almost there’ but just not quite ‘them enough’ until we shed every last remnant of our heritage. Except, of course, for the ones that can be exploited for a diversity initiative or sold for profit. … We abandoned our homelands and everything we knew to escape poverty, to escape violent conditions, to escape systemic oppression. And this whole time, we remained silent while we watched those very same things happen to a group of people who are just slightly different from ourselves. We no longer have time to keep our heads down. …


From “Burnout Is Now Our Default State,” by the therapist and author of Everything Isn’t Terrible: Conquer Your Insecurities, Interrupt Your Anxiety, and Finally Calm Down.


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Photo: Mike Bons/Getty Images

In the New York Times Magazine a couple weeks ago, I was delighted by the account of a guy who gets his quarantine ya-ya’s out by fly-casting off a West Village sidewalk:

I plant myself in the middle of West 12th Street and commence fly-casting — essentially fly-fishing without the fish — slinging 30 or 40 feet of thin nylon line behind me and in front of me, over and over again while stepping in and out of the street in sync with the traffic-light cycles to avoid passing cars, like some kind of bastardized urban version of Brad Pitt in “A River Runs Through It,” God and Norman Maclean forgive me. …

About

Indrani Sen

Editor of Forge, mom, gardener, cook. Formerly at Quartz.

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